Be inspired by Music rhythms, melodies, instruments & songs

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Music is a universal language which can be found in every place there are people. Whether it’s rhythms, melodies, instruments or songs, they are learnt everywhere, each country and culture has its own style.

What can be forgotten is that ‘western’ music isn’t the only type of music worthy of recognition, teaching and learning. There is a whole world of musical instruments being played and songs being sung all the time, kept within the small communities of their origins.

The Last Chance Project, aims to introduce the instruments and teach the songs to the wider world so that the music becomes universal and isn’t confined to the realms of where it originated.

Everyone should have the opportunity to learn the music of different cultures before even those within those communities and cultures forget how special their music is.” 

Martha-Lilly Dyer, Dip ABRSM

‘Last Chance to Paint’ with artist John Dyer and musician Martha-Lilly Dyer is a unique opportunity for schools to engage with endangered environments, people, animals and landscapes using the universal language of art. On previous projects, we have discovered the power of music and how that can help to take us on a journey to another place and to ‘meet’ and connect with the people that create it.

For our new projects we will be actively looking for music to enhance the experience and to really help to connect whole schools to tribal culture and the subject we are focusing on.

The Yawanawá tribe in the Amazon rainforest of Brazil have an amazing musical culture and Nixiwaka Yawanawá’s singing really helped to inspire children during our ‘Spirit of the Rainforest’ project. We are now planning an even bigger project with the Yawanawá tribe, ‘Spirit of the Rainforest 2’.

The sound of the Amazon rainforest

Nixiwaka Yawanawá from the Yawanawá tribe in the Amazon rainforest

During our previous ‘Spirit of the Rainforest’ project, Nixiwaka sang this tribal song and many schools and children around the world learnt the words and performed the song in their own schools whilst engaging on their pieces of art for the project.

‘Happiness’ (the translation of Wacomãya)
Wako ma ya
Tonepîdayke
Pîda kãnaroo
Wako ma ya
Tonepîdayke
Pîda kãnaroo
Tozake opara
Tonepîdayke
Pîda kãnaroo
Ahe ehe
Ahe waya
Wacomãya
Wacomãya
Wacomãya
Wacomãya Heeee aaaa.

The Penan tribe in Borneo also have a strong musical tradition using a variety of instruments including nose flutes. The Penan’s culture and history have been eroded in recent years by the destruction of their rainforest for palm oil and logging, so this really could be the last chance to record and celebrate their rainforest music when we visit the Penan tribe.

Martha-Lilly Dyer will be leading this research on each project that we find has a musical history to discover and share and will not only be recording any singing and music but actively having a go at learning to play the instruments so that she can articulate her experiences to the children who are engaged in ‘Last Chance to Paint’. The combination of art, music and culture is very powerful and should really help to bond children to the many endangered subjects we hope to highlight.

Martha-Lilly is currently studying with a scholarship at one of the UK’s top conservatoires of music, The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama and is one of the UK’s most promising young musicians having already completed 5 years of intensive pre-professional musical training with world-class musicians on a scholarship at Wells Cathedral School as a specialist musician. Wells is one of the UK’s four specialist music schools.

Martha-Lilly Dyer performing in London